Last edited by Gozil
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

5 edition of Benevolence among slaveholders found in the catalog.

Benevolence among slaveholders

assisting the poor in Charleston, 1670-1860

by Barbara L. Bellows

  • 375 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Louisiana State University Press in Baton Rouge .
Written in English

    Places:
  • South Carolina,
  • Charleston
    • Subjects:
    • Poor -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- History.,
    • Charities -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-206) and index.

      StatementBarbara L. Bellows.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV4046.C34 B45 1993
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvii, 217 p. :
      Number of Pages217
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1409422M
      ISBN 100807118338
      LC Control Number93018057

        And the prevalence of Confederate markers such as the Montgomery museum helps normalize notions of benevolence among slaveholders and distort the realities of the era, said University of Alabama history professor Joshua D. Rothman. “There are a lot of people who still want to hold onto those myths,” he said.   Slaveholders' paternalism had little to do with ostensible benevolence, kindness and good cheer. It grew out of the necessity to discipline and morally justify a system of exploitation. At the same time, this book also advocates the examination of masters' relations with white plantation laborers and servants - a largely unstudied subject.

      Douglass sees these holidays not as an illustration of the slaveholders’ benevolence, but as a calculated attempt to prevent insurrection. Slaveholders encourage the slaves to drink heavily and sicken themselves, so that the slaves will believe they cannot live independently. Part of the inhumane fraud of slavery, Douglass says, is to disgust.   In his essay, " 'The Known World' of Free Black Slaveholders," Thomas J. Pressly, using Woodson's statistics, calculated that 54 (or about 1 percent) of these black slave owners in owned between 20 and 84 slaves; (about 4 percent) owned between 10 to 19 slaves; and 3, (about 94 percent) each owned between 1 and 9 slaves. Crucially.

        Sort of true. Historian Steven Mintz describes the situation more accurately in the introduction to his book African-American Voices: A Documentary .   Author points to persistent 'slaveholder religion' among evangelicals for Trump. by Jana Riess. Ma Ma Jana Riess. In the book I .


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Benevolence among slaveholders by Barbara L. Bellows Download PDF EPUB FB2

Benevolence Among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston [Bellows, Barbara L.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Benevolence Among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston Cited by: Benevolence Among Slaveholders is based on a wide range of primary sources, including the papers of urban leaders, minutes of public and private charities, records of municipal institutions, church records, and city newspapers.

Bruce Dorsey. "Review Of "Benevolence Among Slaveholders: Assisting The Poor In Charleston, " By B. Bellows". Journal Of Economic : Bruce Dorsey. Electronic books History: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Bellows, Barbara L.

Benevolence among slaveholders. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, © (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Benevolence among slaveholders book / Contributors: Barbara L Bellows.

Barbara L. Bellows is the author of A Talent for Living ( avg rating, 16 ratings, 3 reviews, published ), Benevolence Among Slaveholders ( av /5. Barbara L. Bellows is the author of Benevolence among Slaveholders: Caring for the Poor in Charleston, and coauthor of God and General Longstreet: Essays on the Lost Cause and the Southern Mind.

Tracing the intersecting lives of a Confederate plantation owner and a free black Union soldier, Barbara L. Bellows’ Two Charlestonians at War offers a poignant allegory of the fraught, interdependent relationship between wartime enemies in the Civil War South.

If one hopes to discover in Barbara Bellows's Benevolence Among Slaveholders precisely how philanthropic southerners reconciled their role as slaveholders with an identity as benevolent philanthropists, that quest will be largely unfulfilled. Barbara L. Bellows is the author of Benevolence among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston, – A professor of history at Middlebury College for seventeen years, she now divides her time between Charleston and s:   And the prevalence of Confederate markers such as the Montgomery museum helps normalize notions of benevolence among slaveholders and distort the realities of the era, said University of Alabama.

How many members did the American Temperance Society have by. 30, b.c.d. One million. Barbara L. Bellows, former professor of history at Middlebury College, is the author of Benevolence among Slaveholders: Caring for the Poor in Charleston, – and A Talent for Living: Josephine Pinckney and the Charleston Literary Tradition.

Thomas Lawrence Connelly, professor of history at the University of South Carolina for many years, was the author or coauthor of numerous books.

The holidays are part and parcel of the gross fraud, wrong, and inhumanity of slavery. They are professedly a custom established by the benevolence of the slaveholders; but I undertake to say, it is the result of selfishness, and one of the grossest frauds committed upon the down-trodden slave.

Building on work by Barbara L. Bellows (Benevolence among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston, –, ), Gail S. Murray (“Charity within the Bounds of Race and Class: Female Benevolence in the Old South,” South Carolina Historical Magazine, Jan.

pp. 54–70), and others, John E. Murray argues that the Charleston. ”—Barbara L. Bellows, author of Benevolence among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston, “ This book will rescue Shadrach Minkins once again from obscurity.

Different readers will find varying ways to connect with this book. Some will value the research above all else; it is a remarkable piece of historical detective work.

Among the best-known and most active female benevolent societies in antebellum South Carolina was the Ladies Benevolent Society of Charleston. Formed in and inspired by the motto “I was sick and you visited me,” the society initially provided home health care to the sick and poor of the city in response to the effects of the War of   The more trade barriers fell, the more markets rewarded slaveholders.

Between andthe value of American cotton exports surged. In his book Free Negro Owners of Slaves in the United States inWoodson wrote that most black slave owners acquired their slave property to preserve family ties.

For example, a husband who was born or had managed to become free might buy his wife from the white person who owned her. It was, he writes, “a race war between black slaves and white slaveholders; it was a struggle among black people over the terms of communal belonging, effective. Bellows, Barbara L.

Benevolence among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston – Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, Jones, Newton B. “The Charleston Orphan House, –,” South Carolina Historical Magazine 62 (October ): – Indenture Books. overwhelming that the vast majority of black slaveholders were free men who purchased members of their families or who acted out of benevolence."5 some black voting even later in parts of Louisiana, but only as a byproduct of corrupt white politics.

Berlin, Slaves Without Masters, ; John B. Boles, Black Southerners, The rest of the Old Testament was often mined by pro-slavery polemicists for examples proving that slavery was common among the Israelites. The New Testament was largely ignored, except in the.Benevolence among slaveholders: assisting the poor in Charleston, / by: Bellows, Barbara L.

Published: () Stono: documenting and interpreting a Southern slave revolt / Published: ().